Today’s Must-Have: Capnography Monitoring During Conscious Sedation

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Clinical Education Podcast with Drs. Matt Kurrek and Richard Merchant

CHICAGO, Nov. 16, 2017 — Today, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety released a clinical education podcast with Matt Kurrek, MD, FRCPC (Professor, Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto) and Richard Merchant, MD, FRCPC (Clinical Professor, University of British Columbia, Department of Anesthesia, Pharmacology & Therapeutics).

Capnography Monitoring: Yesterday's Luxury, Today's Necessity During Conscious Sedation. Matt Kurrek, MD, FRCPC (Professor, Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto) and Richard Merchant, MD, FRCPC (Clinical Professor, University of British Columbia, Department of Anesthesia, Pharmacology & Therapeutics) coauthored an editorial, “Yesterday's Luxury, Today's Necessity,” after the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society [CSA] published its revised 2012…

Drs. Kurrek and Merchant coauthored an editorial, “Yesterday's Luxury, Today's Necessity” after the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society [CSA] published its revised 2012 guidelines to the practice of anesthesia. The CSA guidelines recommend capnography monitoring during conscious sedation. In the podcast, Drs. Kurrek and Merchant discuss why capnography monitoring may have been considered yesterday's luxury, but is now a necessity during conscious sedation.

CSA describes the term “conscious sedation” or “procedural sedation” as follows:

Sedation is “a state of reduced excitement or anxiety that is induced by the administration of a sedative agent”. This condition is distinct from “general anesthesia”, which is described as “a state of total unconsciousness resulting from anesthetic drug(s)” …

Dr. Merchant emphasized that capnography monitoring is “required” monitoring for general anesthesia and sedation (4-6 on the Ramsay Sedation Scale shown below):

We have to recognize that there is reasonable good evidence to support capnographic monitoring, respiratory monitoring, for deep sedated patients … Not surprisingly, evidence for lightly sedated patient is not a very strong … risk is probably related to the depth of sedation and includes by and large respiratory complications … to minimize those, the practitioner would be well advised to see what depths of sedation the patient would actually be best served for, given the patient's co-mormidities, the resources, and the particular procedure.

To read a transcript of the interview, please click here.

The podcast may be viewed on the PPAHS YouTube channel by clicking here.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, to improve healthcare delivery. For more information, please go to www.ppahs.org.

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SOURCE Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

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http://www.ppahs.org

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Brad Bennett

Brad Bennett

Brad grew up in a small town in northern Iowa. He studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married his wife one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children.
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