Robopal Celebrates Kickstarter Success with a Programmable Transformer Robot that Teaches Kids the Basics of Coding via Magnetic Blocks

By , in PR PR Los Angeles on .
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We’re happy see that Robopal has found a supportive audience among parents who want to help their children learn the fundamentals of computer coding in a fun and interactive way.

LOS ANGELES

After raising more than $17,000 during a successful campaign on Kickstarter, the fun, educational Robopal programmable toy robot that helps young children learn programming concepts is now available for presale on the company’s website at http://www.robopal.cc.

“We’re happy see that Robopal has found a supportive audience among parents who want to help their children learn the fundamentals of computer coding in a fun and interactive way,” said Robopal Founder and Creator Jinshuang Zhao. “With computers and programming such an integral part of our society today, we created Robopal to both inspire children while teaching them coding and giving them a simple way to play around with complex coding languages.”

Zhao specifically developed the product to help kids age four and older learn programming concepts offline through a more traditional, fun, educational, gaming hands-on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) experience.

Unlike some other coding toys on the market today that have limitations when it comes to complex coding languages, Robopal makes programming fun and easy – combining magnetic coding blocks to create commands for the robot to transform it into anything that children can imagine.

While Robopal introduces kids to programming in a gaming environment, it also offers early preparation for a future career in computer programming. According to a recent gradireland report, there is a strong demand for computer programmers who can write object-oriented code such as Java, C++ and C#.

“By introducing their children to Robopal early, parents are not only helping their kids learn the concepts of computer programming, but they also could be preparing them for lucrative programming careers as adults,” Zhao said.
Robopal can be used by a variety of people and organizations, including:

●    Parents and grandparents, who want to interact with their children and grandchildren while both learn about coding by playing with their own Do-It-Yourself robot
●    Teachers, who can use Robopal as a tool to teach coding in a fun way
●    Kids, who can play and explore programming with Robopal by themselves
●    Adults interested in robotics who want to learn basic coding

Robopal can also be programmed for special uses like guarding a home, where it can simulate an alarm when its infrared sensor senses people, and can even be coded to interact with household pets.

Zhao adds that there are no digital devices needed to program Robopal.

For more information or to preorder Robopal, visit the company’s website at http://www.robopal.cc.

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Sarah Thompson

Sarah Thompson

Sarah is a financial reporter, focusing on technology, national security, and policing. Before joining Daily Telescope she worked as a staff writer at Fast Company and spent two years as a foreign correspondent in Turkey. Her work has been published in Al Jazeera America, The Nation, Vice News, Motherboard, and many other outlets.
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