Nursing Academy Releases Policy Recommendations, Warning on Environmental Noise

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Well-documented, negative effects include hearing loss, tinnitus, heart disease, stroke, anxiety, stress, depression, learning difficulties, poor job performance, sleep disorders, and reduced cognitive abilities.

Washington, DC

The American Academy of Nursing today released its policy brief urging the reduction of environmental noise, which is a known public health hazard. Environmental noise may negatively affect health through increased rates of various diseases which also leads to increased costs on the U.S. healthcare system.

Sources of environmental noise may include loud household or workplace equipment, public events such as music concerts, and traffic associated with airports, highways, and railways. The negative health impacts of environmental noise are not always immediately noticed, and can build gradually over time. Well-documented, these effects include hearing loss, tinnitus, heart disease, stroke, anxiety, stress, depression, learning difficulties, poor job performance, sleep disorders, and reduced cognitive abilities.

The Academy’s policy brief, “Reduce Noise: Improve the Nation’s Health,” was published in the September/October 2017 issue of the Academy’s journal, Nursing Outlook.

“The Academy is pleased to publish this important policy brief on reducing exposure to environmental noise, and its associated negative effects on the public’s health,” said Academy President, Karen Cox, PhD, RN, FACHE, FAAN. “The Academy has long noted the problem of environmental noise, and this policy brief builds upon our official position statement from 2016, and adds significantly to our recommendations.”

The Academy recommends a coordinated federal effort in reducing exposure to environmental noise, including the reestablishment of the Office of Noise Abatement and Control within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Academy also encourages the EPA to establish a centralized reporting system to collect data on environmental noise from airports, highways, and industrial sites, among others. In addition, the Academy also supports collaborations and partnerships to educate and disseminate information to the public on the health effects from exposure to sources of environmental noise.

Read the full policy brief at http://www.nursingoutlook.org/article/S0029-6554(17)30403-7/fulltext

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About the American Academy of Nursing
The American Academy of Nursing (http://www.AANnet.org) serves the public and the nursing profession by advancing health policy and practice through the generation, synthesis, and dissemination of nursing knowledge. The Academy's more than 2,500 fellows are nursing's most accomplished leaders in education, management, practice, and research. They have been recognized for their extraordinary contributions to nursing and healthcare.

CONTACT:
Barry Eisenberg
202-777-1174
Barry_Eisenberg(at)aannet(dot)org

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Brad Bennett

Brad Bennett

Brad grew up in a small town in northern Iowa. He studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married his wife one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children.
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