New Cancer Treatment Technology Coming to Utah

By , in PR PR Health on .

SALT LAKE CITY, Dec. 21, 2017 — A new cancer treatment technology is one step closer to Salt Lake City. Today Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) announced a plan to add a proton therapy center to its Cancer Hospital. Huntsman Cancer Foundation, HCI and the Cancer Hospital have agreed to dedicate the required funding to the project. The plan will now move forward to the next steps of approval, design and vendor selection.

Huntsman Cancer Institute

Proton therapy is a type of radiation therapy, a cancer treatment that delivers beams of radiation to shrink a tumor. Proton treatment has been found to be an effective radiation therapy option for numerous types of cancers. This includes childhood cancers, and adult cancers such as head and neck tumors, brain tumors, prostate cancer, lymphomas, pancreas cancer, and esophageal cancer. Proton therapy is often the favored course of treatment when a tumor is close to a vital structure, such as the spinal cord or brain stem. 

HCI will use Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) technology for their center. IMPT delivers precise, pencil-thin beams of protons to a tumor, providing an advantage over earlier scattered-beam therapy that is in place in other proton therapy centers. This helps to ensure the maximum dose of radiation to the tumor, while minimizing the damage to surrounding healthy tissues. As a result, patients suffer from fewer side effects from their radiation. Experience with early proton therapy machines has shown that patients for whom this treatment is appropriate benefit from reduced side effects when treated with proton therapy versus other radiation therapy approaches. And with IMPT, the team at HCI expects the benefit to patients in terms of reduced side effects to be even greater than with earlier proton technology.

“An intensity modulated proton therapy center in Utah adds a critical new tool to our array of outstanding radiation therapy technology and research here at HCI,” said Dennis Shrieve, MD, PhD, professor and chair of Radiation Oncology at the U of U and investigator at HCI.  “This new technology will allow patients who will most benefit from proton therapy to avoid disruptive travel far from home. Further, HCI will be able to contribute to research in most effective uses of intensity modulated proton therapy technology in the treatment of cancer.”

The nearest proton centers to Salt Lake City are currently located in southern Arizona and central California, approximately a 10-hour drive away. Patients who are given proton therapy may need to plan for a treatment course that occurs five days a week and spans four to eight weeks. HCI estimates it refers more than 40 patients per year to centers out of state.

“Bringing proton therapy to Utah is completely in keeping with the vision we had when we founded HCI over two decades ago,” said Jon M. Huntsman, founder and principal benefactor of HCI. “I remain absolutely committed to ensure that our patients have access the very best equipment and expertise to fight their cancer. Proton therapy is yet another tool we will bring to our patients to give them the best possible outcomes against this dreadful disease.”

“Approximately half of all cancer patients receive some type of radiation therapy as a part of their treatment,” said John Sweetenham, MD, senior director of clinical affairs at HCI and professor of medicine at the U of U.  “We have observed research in the effectiveness of proton therapy over the past several years. After extensive analysis, we determined it was an important investment to make to bring this technology to our patients here in the Mountain West.”

HCI leaders anticipate they will initiate a public bidding process to identify an appropriate equipment supplier in the coming weeks. Final project specifications will be subject to approval by institutional and state bodies.

The proposed location for this new technology will be on the south end of the Cancer Hospital at HCI. It is projected to serve approximately 200 patients a year. The center is projected to be operational in fall 2020.

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is the official cancer center of Utah. The cancer campus includes a state-of-the-art cancer specialty hospital as well as two buildings dedicated to cancer research. HCI treats patients with all forms of cancer and operates several clinics that focus on patients with a family history of cancer. As the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in the Mountain West, HCI serves the largest geographic region in the country, drawing patients from Utah, Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. HCI scientists have identified more genes for inherited cancers than any other cancer center in the world, including genes responsible for hereditary breast, ovarian, colon, head, and neck cancers, along with melanoma. HCI manages the Utah Population Database – the largest genetic database in the world, with information on more than 9 million people linked to genealogies, health records, and vital statistics. The institute was founded by Jon M. and Karen Huntsman. Mr. Huntsman is a Utah philanthropist, industrialist, and cancer survivor.

Contact:

Debby Rogers
Huntsman Cancer Institute
(801) 587-7639
[email protected]

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-cancer-treatment-technology-coming-to-utah-300574760.html

SOURCE Huntsman Cancer Institute

The following two tabs change content below.
Brad Bennett

Brad Bennett

Brad grew up in a small town in northern Iowa. He studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married his wife one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children.
%d bloggers like this: