NASA Launch of NOAA Weather Satellite Rescheduled for Nov. 18

By , in PR PR Health on .

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2017 — The launch of the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) satellite, the first in a new series of four highly advanced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites, now is scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 18, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Launch coverage will be carried live on NASA Television and the agency's website.

Liftoff aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for 4:47 a.m. EST (1:47 a.m. PST).

NASA TV launch coverage begins at 4:15 a.m. and will conclude after the deployment of four small satellite missions, called CubeSats, which will accompany JPSS-1 as payload on the Delta II rocket. There is no planned post-launch news conference. A post-launch news release will be issued as soon as the state-of-health of the spacecraft is verified.

JPSS represents significant technological and scientific advancements in observations used for severe weather prediction and environmental monitoring. JPSS is a collaborative effort between NOAA and NASA. The JPSS system will help increase weather forecast accuracy from three to seven days.

Audio only of the news conferences and launch coverage will be carried on the NASA “V” circuits, which may be accessed by dialing 321-867-1220, -1240, -1260 or -7135. On launch day, “mission audio,” the launch conductor's countdown activities without NASA TV launch commentary, will be carried on 321-867-7135.

Additional launch day coverage will be available on NASA.gov. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning at 4:15 a.m. as countdown milestones occur. You can follow countdown coverage on our launch blog at https://blogs.nasa.gov/jpss.

To learn more about the JPSS-1 mission, visit:

http://www.jpss.noaa.gov

and

https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/jpss-1 

Join the conversation and follow the JPSS-1 mission on social media by using Twitter and Facebook at:

https://twitter.com/NOAASatellites

and

https://www.facebook.com/NOAANESDIS/

 

SOURCE NASA

The following two tabs change content below.
Brad Bennett

Brad Bennett

Brad grew up in a small town in northern Iowa. He studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married his wife one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children.
%d bloggers like this: