Free Admission into the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and Museum of Mississippi History in Honor of National Day of Racial Healing

By , in PR PR Economy on .

JACKSON, Miss., Jan. 12, 2018 – In honor of the second annual National Day of Racial Healing (NDORH), the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) is supporting free admission for the public into the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and Museum of Mississippi History on Saturday through Tuesday, Jan. 13-Jan. 16.

“The museums tell powerful stories about our state's past and how the racial hierarchies in Mississippi in particular have impacted everything from our education system to our economy,” said Rhea Williams-Bishop, director of Mississippi programming for the Kellogg Foundation. “The National Day of Racial Healing helps us come together and develop a shared understanding of our history, as an important step in healing and moving us toward a stronger future for our children.” 

Hundreds of events and activities are planned for Jan. 16 across the country by individuals, organizations, governments, businesses and faith-based institutions as part of NDORH. The day was established in 2017 by more than 130 organizations and partners of WKKF's Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation efforts who wanted to set aside a day to find ways to focus on healing the wounds created by conscious and unconscious biases.

“The Kellogg Foundation's gift of free admission to the Two Mississippi Museums is a most appropriate and meaningful way to honor Dr. Martin Luther King and to celebrate his extraordinary legacy,” said Katie Blount, director of Mississippi Department of Archives and History. ”We look forward to welcoming thousands of people to the Two Mississippi Museums over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend, and we are so grateful to the Kellogg Foundation for their continued generosity and support.”

The museums opened on Dec. 9 at 222 North Street in downtown Jackson with support from the foundation, including $2.3 million in 2014 to seed the vision of the Civil Rights Museum and another $1 million endowment announced during the grand opening in December 2017.

While the museum typically is closed on Mondays, they will be open on Monday, Jan. 15, to honor Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The museum hours are:

Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 1 p.m to 5 p.m.
Monday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

In addition to free admission into the two museums, visitors can also take their entrance tickets to the Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center for courtesy admission from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 13, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 16. The museum, located at 528 Bloom Street, is dedicated to increasing public understanding and awareness of the historical experience and cultural expressions of people of African descent. 

About the W.K. Kellogg Foundation
The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal pioneer, Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, WKKF works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life.

The Kellogg Foundation is based in Battle Creek, Michigan, and works throughout the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Special emphasis is paid to priority places where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority places in the U.S. are in Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti.

Cision View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/free-admission-into-the-mississippi-civil-rights-museum-and-museum-of-mississippi-history-in-honor-of-national-day-of-racial-healing-300581964.html

SOURCE W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Related Links

http://www.wkkf.org

The following two tabs change content below.
Brad Bennett

Brad Bennett

Brad grew up in a small town in northern Iowa. He studied chemistry in college, graduated, and married his wife one month later. They were then blessed with two baby boys within the first four years of marriage. Having babies gave their family a desire to return to the old paths – to nourish their family with traditional, homegrown foods; rid their home of toxic chemicals and petroleum products; and give their boys a chance to know a simple, sustainable way of life. They are currently building a homestead from scratch on two little acres in central Texas. There’s a lot to be done to become somewhat self-sufficient, but they are debt-free and get to spend their days living this simple, good life together with their five young children.
%d bloggers like this: